NORDHEIM VOR DER RHON _ 0594

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Nordheim vor der Rhön is a municipality in the district of Rhön-Grabfeld in Bavaria in Germany. It is located in the upper Streu valley, between Ostheim and Fladungen.
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

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From Germany
Travel from July 11 to July 25
Thanks Diana !

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ERLENSTEGEN N.144 _ 0522

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The Nuremberg–Cheb railway is a 151 km long, non-electrified main line, mainly in the German state of Bavaria. It runs from Nuremberg via Lauf an der Pegnitz, Hersbruck, Pegnitz, Kirchenlaibach, Marktredwitz and Schirnding to Cheb in the Czech Republic. The route is also known as the Right (bank of the) Pegnitz line (German: rechte Pegnitzstrecke or the Pegnitz Valley Railway (Pegnitztalbahn). It was built as the Fichtel Range Railway (Fichtelgebirgsbahn). The Nuremberg–Schnabelwaid section of it is part of the Saxon-Franconian trunk line (Sachsen-Franken-Magistrale).
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

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From Germany
Travel from May 6 to May 14
Thanks Daniela !

NORDLINGEN _ 0491

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Nördlingen is a town in the Donau-Ries district, in Bavaria, Germany, with a population of approximately 24,000. It was first mentioned in recorded history in 898 and in 1998 the town celebrated its 1100th Anniversary. The town was also the location of two battles during the Thirty Years’ War, a war which took place between 1618–1648. Today it is one of only three towns in Germany that still has a completely established city wall, the other two being Rothenburg ob der Tauber and Dinkelsbühl.
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

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From Germany
Travel from April 30 to May 9
Thanks Sebastian !

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Middle Ages in Nuremberg

Nuremberg was probably founded around the turn of the 11th century, according to the first documentary mention of the city in 1050, as the location of an Imperial castle between the East Franks and the Bavarian March of the Nordgau. From 1050 to 1571, the city expanded and rose dramatically in importance due to its location on key trade routes. King Conrad III established a burgraviate, with the first burgraves coming from the Austrian House of Raab but, with the extinction of their male line around 1190, the burgraviate was inherited by the last count’s son-in-law, of the House of Hohenzollern. From the late 12th century to the Interregnum (1254–73), however, the power of the burgraves diminished as the Hohenstaufen emperors transferred most non-military powers to a castellan, with the city administration and the municipal courts handed over to an Imperial mayor (German: Reichsschultheiß) from 1173/74. The strained relations between the burgraves and the castellan, with gradual transferral of powers to the latter in the late 14th and early 15th centuries, finally broke out into open enmity, which greatly influenced the history of the city.
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

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From Altdorf, Germany
Thanks Dani !

SCHLOSS NEUSCHWANSTEIN _ 0279

Neuschwanstein Castle is a nineteenth-century Romanesque Revival palace on a rugged hill above the village of Hohenschwangau near Füssen in southwest Bavaria, Germany. The palace was commissioned by Ludwig II of Bavaria as a retreat and as a homage to Richard Wagner. Ludwig paid for the palace out of his personal fortune and by means of extensive borrowing, rather than Bavarian public funds.
The palace was intended as a personal refuge for the reclusive king, but it was opened to the paying public immediately after his death in 1886.[1] Since then more than 61 million people have visited Neuschwanstein Castle. More than 1.3 million people visit annually, with as many as 6,000 per day in the summer. The palace has appeared prominently in several movies and was the inspiration for Disneyland’s Sleeping Beauty Castle and later, similar structures.
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

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From Germany
Thanks Lena !

BAYERN _ 0205

Tradition in Bayern

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10-1From Germany
Thanks Sigrid !